Corporation for National Community Service

This multi-year project led by Dr. Pamela Paxton has investigated the links between nonprofit community organizations and Americorp programming within a community and that community's subjective well-being. Combining social media data, IRS tax documents, and nationally available community-level data sets, we have presented at national conferences, hosted webinars, and written several articles ready for publication


Institute of Education Sciences

Dr. Robert Crosnoe pulled together a team of graduate students and post docs to work on projects that focus on minority and immigrant experiences within the early childhood education market, and education more generally. With this support I have produced several first-authored and co-authored manuscripts.


Dissertation

My dissertation evaluates the connections between nonprofit community organizations and parental involvement practices between families and schools. I take a mixed-methods approach to analyzing national data with the simultaneous collecting of interviews from parents of elementary school children. This has the additional support of Drs. Chandra Muller and Jennifer Adair.

 

The Cutting Room Floor


 I created this figure for a project that compares graduation from high school and enrollment in college in the U.S., Mexico, and Brazil. It displays the significant interaction between race/ethnicity and year predicting enrollment in college during the Great Recession. Both hispanic and non-hispanic whites demonstrate increasing college enrollment across the recession, while non-hispanic and hispanic blacks experienced a stable or decreasing trend, suggesting the Great Recession increased inequalities in educational attainment. This graph is not peer reviewed, but comes from data available in through  IPUMS . 

I created this figure for a project that compares graduation from high school and enrollment in college in the U.S., Mexico, and Brazil. It displays the significant interaction between race/ethnicity and year predicting enrollment in college during the Great Recession. Both hispanic and non-hispanic whites demonstrate increasing college enrollment across the recession, while non-hispanic and hispanic blacks experienced a stable or decreasing trend, suggesting the Great Recession increased inequalities in educational attainment. This graph is not peer reviewed, but comes from data available in through IPUMS